We Fight Censorship - Society https://www.wefightcensorship.org/themes/society en Local news sites blocked https://www.wefightcensorship.org/censored/local-news-sites-blocked <div id="node-field-pays" class="field field-name-field-pays field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><a href="/geo-zone/jordanie" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel">Jordanie</a></div> </div> </div> <div id="node-field-thematique" class="field field-name-field-thematique field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><a href="/themes/society" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel">Society</a></div> </div> </div> <div id="node-field-chapeau" class="field field-name-field-chapeau field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Jordanian government blocks access to 291 news websites.<br />The memo from Fazey Shawabkeh, the head of the Press and Publications Department, to Mohamed Azzat Ta’ani, the head of the Telecommunication Regulatory Commission, was short and to the point. Access to news websites that had not obtained a government licence must henceforth be blocked.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div id="node-body" class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"> <p>Shawabkeh at first denied issuing the order but it was <a href="http://www.petranews.gov.jo/nepras/2013/Jun/02/12000.htm">confirmed</a> later the same day by the <a href="http://www.petranews.gov.jo/">government news agency Petra</a>, which quoted a statement by the Press and Publications Department giving its grounds for blocking the sites:<br /><br />"<em>The blockage was not meant to restrict freedoms. Is regulation and law enforcement and abidance a restriction? The ultimate goal of this action is to regulate the work of these websites and protect them, and not allow those outside the media profession to claim they are journalists and take the role of journalists, which is highly respected.</em>"<br /><br />Article 49 of the amended version of the 1998 Press and Publications Act requires all online publications to register with the authorities. When the latest amendments were published by royal decree in September 2012, <a href="http://www.hrw.org/news/2013/06/04/jordan-rescind-order-block-websites">many news sites refused to register</a> as a protest against what they regarded as a threat to their independence and freedom.<br /><br />When the Press and Publications Department issued its memo on 2 June, the <strong>Telecommunication Regulatory Commission</strong> immediately complied, instructing Jordan’s Internet Service Providers to block access to the <strong>291 sites</strong> that had not yet obtained a licence.<br /><br />Independent news websites expressing political views have grown in number and popularity in recent years. <em>Sarayanews</em>, one of the blocked sites, has more online readers that the leading pro-government daily newspapers such as <em>Al-Rai</em> and <em>Al-Dustour.</em><br /><br />The source of news and views that stray from the official line, these websites have become the one of the main bugbears for the government, which has repeatedly tried to control and censor online publications. Hence the latest version of the Press and Publications Act, adopted in September, and the decision to block the 291 sites.<br /><br />The decision came two weeks after the International Press Institute held its annual world congress in Amman from 19 to 21 May, during which Jordanian Prime Minister Abdullah Ensour praised the role played by the media and claimed that the protection of freedoms, including media freedom, was one of the priorities of his government’s ongoing reforms.<br /><br />The <a href="https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2013/06/jordan-takes-disappointing-turn-to">Electronic Frontier Foundation</a> said the Jordanian authorities seem to have deliberately waited until after the congress to block the websites.<br /><br />The ISPs are for the time being used domain names to block the sites (DNS blocking). So far, not all of the sites have been blocked and the IPSs may eventually use a more drastic form of blocking, such as IP blocking.<br />Reporters Without Borders wrote an <a href="http://en.rsf.org/jordan-letter-to-king-abdullah-about-18-06-2013,44791.html">open letter to King Abdullah</a> on 12 June asking him to lift the blocking on these websites.<br /><br />Below, we are posting the complete list of websites earmarked for blocking, Fazey Shawabkeh’s memo and the Telecommunication Regulatory Commission’s directive to the ISPs, ordering them to block the 291 listed websites. These documents <a href="http://7iber.com/2013/06/internet-blocking-begins-in-jordan/">were first published by 7iber.com</a>, and we thank them for their cooperation.<br /><br />Please <a href="contact">contact</a> us if you would like to help translate any of these documents.<br /><br /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="962" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/1_0.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="962" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/2_0.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/3_copy.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/4_copy.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/5_copy.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/6_copy_0.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/7_copy.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/8_copy.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/9_copy.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/10_copy.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/11_copy.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/12_copy_0.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/13_copy_0.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/14_1.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/15_0.png" /></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="961" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/16_0.png" /></p> </div> </div> </div> <ul class="links inline"><li class="translation_ar first"><a href="/ar/censored/lsltt-lrdny-tjry-frz-lmwqh-lkhbry-llktrwny" title="السلطات الأردنية تجري فرزا لمواقعها الإخبارية الإلكترونية" class="translation-link">العربية</a></li> <li class="translation_fr last"><a href="/fr/censored/autorites-jordaniennes-font-tri-parmi-leurs-sites-dinformations" title=" Les autorités jordaniennes font le tri parmi leurs sites d’informations" class="translation-link">Français</a></li> </ul> Thu, 13 Jun 2013 16:05:38 +0000 gregoire.pouget 136 at https://www.wefightcensorship.org Looking at reality head-on? “Extremist,” the KGB says https://www.wefightcensorship.org/censored/looking-reality-head-extremist-kgb-says <div id="node-field-pays" class="field field-name-field-pays field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><a href="/geo-zone/belarus-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel">Belarus</a></div> </div> </div> <div id="node-field-thematique" class="field field-name-field-thematique field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><a href="/themes/society" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel">Society</a></div> </div> </div> <div id="node-field-chapeau" class="field field-name-field-chapeau field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Despite government harassment, independent photojournalism is alive and well in “Europe’s last dictatorship.” <a href="http://pressphoto.by/?p=1610">For the fourth year running</a>, the Belarus Press Photo competition (BPP) is poised to award local photographers who have a gift for covering the most varied range of social issues with an independent approach. But this bold initiative is the victim of censorship. According to the Committee for State Security (KGB), the book of the photos that won prizes in the 2011 competition contains “extremist” works. Two of BPP’s organizers, Yuliya Darashkevich (Юлия Дарашкевич) and Vadim Zamirouski (Вадим Замировский) are to appear in court on 17 April 2013. If the court rules in favour of the KGB, all copies of the book will be seized and destroyed.WeFightCensorship presents photos from the Belarus Press Photo 2011 book here.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div id="node-body" class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"> <p><a href="http://pressphoto.by/?p=402#more-402">Belarus Press Photo</a> is particularly remarkable in a country that is ranked 157th out of 179 countries in the latest Reporters Without Borders <a href="http://en.rsf.org/press-freedom-index-2013,1054.html">press freedom index</a>. For the past four years, the project has set itself the mission of “supporting and developing photojournalism in Belarus and contributing to the freedom to exchange professional information and experiences.” Dozens of photographers participate each year. A jury of Belarusian and foreign professional photographers (including Stanley Greene and Yury Kozyrev this year) chooses the best photos, which are then published and displayed in Belarus and abroad.<br />&nbsp;<br />On 12 November 2012, Belarusian customs officials seized 41 copies of the “Belarus Press Photo 2011” book from the car in which three photographers were returning to Belarus after taking part in exhibitions in Lithuania. Although the book had been printed legally and all the custom duties had been paid, the customs officials claimed that <a href="http://baj.by/en/node/18528">“technical standards” had not been respected</a>. The copies were then transferred to the KGB, which asked “experts” to decide whether the book included “extremist” content.<br />&nbsp;<br />No photographer was asked to be part of the “expert committee” that was formed and led by the head of the western region of Hrodna’s ideological department. <a href="http://baj.by/en/node/20367">It found</a> that “Belarus Press Photo 2011” <a href="http://baj.by/en/node/20498">did indeed include “extremist” content</a>. It said that the book contained “deliberately distorted insinuations contrary to the reality of life in the Republic of Belarus (…) which humiliate national honour and the dignity of its citizens.” The committee added that “from the viewpoint of social standards (…) and decency,” the photos undermine “state authority” and “confidence in government officials.”</p> <p>Yuliya Darashkevich told Reporters Without Borders: “Photojournalism consists of taking snapshots of life as it is, without embellishing it. I don’t see how this can distort reality or conflict with it. I don’t agree with the overall conclusion (by the experts that the book] shows Belarus in a negative light. On the contrary, Belarus is shown from different angles.”<br />&nbsp;<br />One is immediately struck by the variety of subjects and techniques shown in “Belarus Press Photo 2011” – scenes from daily life, news reportage, nature and cultural activities. The viewpoints are varied and the negative aspects of the lives of Belarusians are far from dominant. But this very richness and diversity pose a challenge to the monolithic character of the regime headed by Alexander Lukashenko and his claim to embody his entire nation.<br />&nbsp;<br />The book shows no sign of censorship and devotes a lot of space to the violent crackdown on peaceful demonstrations in 2010. Conditions in the army are revealed in other photos, including Syarhey Gudilin’s cover photo, which won the top prize in 2011. It shows army recruits watching the state TV news programme, as they must every day, overseen by a photo of President Lukashenko on a wall.</p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="453" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/conscrits.jpg" /></p> <p><small>Obligatory watching of the evening news under the eye of the president Alexander Lukashenka.<br />Photo by Siarhei Hudzilin. Barysau. August 2010 (Grand-Prix 2011)</small></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="453" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/manifestant.jpg" /></p> <p><small>Presidential elections. A ot policeman lifts up a participant of the protest action near the broken doors of the House of Government.<br />Photo by Sergey Gapon. Minsk. December 2010.</small></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="444" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/fosse_commune.jpg" /></p> <p><small>Re-burial ceremony at the German war cemetery. Workers lay coffins with remains of German soldiers killed in Belarus during World War II.<br />Photo by Vasily Fedosenko. Scatkava village. November 2010.</small></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="566" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/vpourvictoire.jpg" /></p> <p><small>A man shows the V (Victory) sign out of the prison window.<br />Photo by Viktor Drachev. Minsk. December 2010</small></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="518" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/tenniswoman.jpg" /></p> <p><small>Tennis player, Caroline Wozniacki (Denmark), takes part in a charity game against Belarusian Victoria Azaranka (Belarus). The experts of KGB think that these photos present elements of Belarusian sport life from the “poor aesthetic perspective”, some of them even “disgraceful” and they “demonstrate the sphere of Belarusian public life from the negative viewpoint”.<br />Photo by Viktor Drachev. Minsk. November 2010.</small></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="465" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/drapeau-poubelle.jpg" /></p> <p><small>A torn-off state flag lies in the street after the protest. KGB thinks that this photo “presents the author’s own invention and belittles the State symbol of Belarus, the honor and dignity of Belarusian people”.<br />Photo by Sergei Grits. Minsk. December 2010.</small></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="453" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/loukachenko.jpg" /></p> <p><small>Shadows of Christmas decorations fall on the projection screen in the Minks nightclub, The Black Door, during a New Year’s speech of the President of Belarus, Alexander Lukashenka. The authorities proclaim that this photo “was deliberately shot from the viewpoint, in order to present the Head of state unattractively. The illustration offends the President of Belarus, belittles his authority and undermines confidence in him on the part of foreign states and citizens of the Republic of Belarus”. Photo by Dzmitry Kliapitski. Minsk. 31 décember 2010.</small></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="812" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/museum.jpg" /></p> <p><small>Identity. Personal exhibition of famous Belarusian artist, Barys Zaborau, has opened in the National Art Museum. <br />Photo by Viachaslau Tsuranau. Minsk, November 2010.&nbsp;</small></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="471" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/danse.jpg" /></p> <p><small>The 23rd International festival of modern choregraphy<br />Photo by Sergei Grits. Viciebsk. November 2010</small>.</p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="453" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/bapteme.jpg" /></p> <p><small>People dip into the icy waters of Cnianskaje reservoir during the Orthodox Epiphany celebration. <br />Photo by Natallia Ablazhei. Minsk, January 2010.</small></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="680" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/squirrel.jpg" /></p> <p><small>From the series "Fake animals", dedicated to portraits of stuffed animals from museums and hunting exhibitions. <br />Photo by Andrei Liankevich. Minsk, 2010.&nbsp;</small></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="455" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/horses.jpg" /></p> <p><small>Horses graze in a field <br />Photo by Alexander Vasukovich. Navasiolki village&nbsp; . October 2010.</small></p> <p><img alt="" class="media-image" height="448" width="680" typeof="foaf:Image" src="sites/default/files/14penitentiary_0.jpg" /></p> <p><small>Penitentiary colony. Women line up near the gate, waiting for the convoys to lead them to the tailor shop to work. <br />Photo by Viachaslau Tsuranau. Recyca, December 2007. <br /></small></p> </div> </div> </div> <ul class="links inline"><li class="translation_fr first"><a href="/fr/censored/voir-realite-en-face-extremiste-selon-kgb" title="Voir la réalité en face? “Extrémiste”, selon le KGB" class="translation-link">Français</a></li> <li class="translation_ru last"><a href="/ru/censored/vzglyanut-pravde-v-lico-soglasno-kgb-eto-ekstremizm" title="Взглянуть правде в лицо? Согласно КГБ, это экстремизм." class="translation-link">Русский</a></li> </ul> Tue, 16 Apr 2013 13:41:11 +0000 gregoire.pouget 110 at https://www.wefightcensorship.org Kazakhstan : Zhanaozen – a city cut off from the rest of the world a year ago https://www.wefightcensorship.org/censored/kazakhstan-zhanaozen-city-cut-rest-world-year-ago <div id="node-field-pays" class="field field-name-field-pays field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><a href="/geo-zone/kazakhstan" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel">Kazakhstan</a></div> </div> </div> <div id="node-field-thematique" class="field field-name-field-thematique field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><a href="/themes/society" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel">Society</a></div> </div> </div> <div id="node-field-chapeau" class="field field-name-field-chapeau field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>A strike by oil workers snowballed a year ago in Zhanaozen, in western Kazakhstan, and ended up being crushed brutally by the security forces on 16 December 2011. The authorities skilfully imposed a news blackout on the event at the local, regional and national levels. Opposition media that tried to cover this highly sensitive story were subjected to growing harassment that culminated a year later with their being banned outright.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div id="node-body" class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"> <h2>How a censored event was used as grounds for censorship</h2> <p>The video presented here was one of the first amateur videos of the events in Zhanaozen that circulated on social networks before being picked up by independent and opposition media. It clearly shows something that the authorities initially tried to cover up at all costs – the fact that the police fired live rounds at protesters and then beat the wounded as they lay on the ground. The National Security Committee (KNB) put a great deal of pressure on the media in an attempt to identify the authors of this and similar videos.</p> <p><video tabindex="0" controls="controls" style="margin-bottom: 15px;" height="360" width="640"> <source src="sites/default/files/janaozen_3.mp4" type="video/mp4" /> <source src="sites/default/files/janaozen_3.ogv" type="video/ogg" /></video></p> <p>Evidence of this kind forced the authorities to recognize the use of disproportionate force and to punish the police officers responsible. But this has not stopped President Nursultan Nazarbayev’s autocratic government from blaming the violence on opposition parties and media and accusing them of deliberately trying to destabilize the country. The events in Zhanaozen ended up being used as grounds for an increased crackdown. National opposition media were closed in December 2012.</p> <h2>Means of communication selectively disconnected</h2> <p>Kazakhstan’s 20th independence anniversary celebrations were disrupted in Zhanaozen by oil workers who had been hounded and fired for going on strike. They occupied the city’s central square but were expelled in order to make way for the festivities. When police used live rounds to fire on a crowd of protesters, riots broke out and spread throughout the city. Most government buildings were set on fire.</p> <p>The official toll was 15 dead and around 100 wounded. A demonstrator was killed the next day at the railway station in the nearby town of Shetpe as a detachment of special forces were passing through on their way to Zhanaozen. The Kazakh judicial system’s incomplete and biased investigations failed to explain exactly how the events unfolded.</p> <p>Zhanaozen and the surrounding region were cut off from the world. For several days, the Internet and telecommunications were disconnected in a radius of about 65 km around the city – on the official grounds that cables had been damaged. Throughout the region, including its capital, Aktau, where tense demonstrations were held, it was impossible to send or receive SMS messages or access the Internet using a smartphone.</p> <p>Twitter was blocked throughout the country on 16 December and was not restored until the following day. Several leading news websites such Guljan.org, the Russian citizen news agency Ridus.ru and the opposition newspaper Respublika’s news portal were also inaccessible.</p> <h2>From blocking to control of journalist</h2> <p>A 20-day state of emergency and curfew were declared in Zhanaozen. Checkpoints were established all around both Zhanaozen and Aktau. Journalists needed to obtain accreditation from the regional government in order to visit the region. The first journalists to go there were given a military escort. They described a deserted city patrolled by heavily-armed men. It was very hard in these circumstances to talk to residents, who were reluctant to talk for a long time.</p> <p>The authorities loosened the restrictions on journalists a bit after several days but continued to monitor their movements closely. Russian journalists were held at a police station in Zhanaozen for several hours on 18 December while the contents of their computers, USB flash drives and audio recorders were carefully examined.&nbsp; Considerable constraints were placed on the movements of Stan TV, Radio Azattyk, Associated Press and Al-Jazeera reporters by special forces the same day in Shetpe.</p> <h2>One year on – pluralism close to death</h2> <p>The government portrayed the events in Zhanaozen as a destabilization attempt orchestrated by the opposition, and quickly used this interpretation as grounds for gagging its critics. The leaders of several opposition parties were arrested and the head of the Alga party, Vladimir Kozlov, was sentenced to seven and a half years in prison and confiscation of all of his assets. Throughout 2012, reporters of independent and opposition media found themselves being arrested, summoned for questioning by the security services, physically attacked or the targets of intimidation attempts.</p> <p>The escalation reached a tipping point on the first anniversary of the Zhanaozen unrest. Prosecutors in the capital Almaty brought “extremism” charges against the main opposition national news media. Within a few weeks, the Respublika and Vzglyad newspapers, the satellite TV station K+ and the Stan TV news agency had all been forced to suspend activities. The news website Guljan.org was suspended. What with rushed trials, convictions in absentia and violation of defence rights, the judicial system no longer even tries to maintain a semblance of respectability.</p> <ol> <li>Stan TV : mirror website <a href="http://stan.rsf.org/">http://stan.rsf.org/</a>, download <a href="http://stan.rsf.org/archive.tar.gz">the full website</a></li> <li>K+ : mirror website <a href="http://kplus-tv.rsf.org/">http://kplus-tv.rsf.org/</a>, download <a href="http://kplus-tv.rsf.org/archive.tar.gz">the full website</a></li> <li>Respublika : mirror website <a href="http://respublika-kz.rsf.org/">http://respublika-kz.rsf.org/</a>, download <a href="http://respublica-kz.rsf.org/archive.tar.gz">the full website</a></li> <li>Vzglyad : mirror website <a href="http://vzglyad.rsf.org/">http://vzglyad.rsf.org/</a>,&nbsp; download <a href="http://vzglyad.rsf.org/archive.tar.gz">the full website</a></li> </ol> </div> </div> </div> <ul class="links inline"><li class="translation_fr first"><a href="/fr/censored/kazakhstan-il-y-janaozen-ville-coupee-du-monde" title="Kazakhstan : Il y a un an à Janaozen, une ville coupée du monde" class="translation-link">Français</a></li> <li class="translation_ru last"><a href="/ru/censored/kazahstan-zhanaozen-gorod-izolirovannyy-ot-ostalnogo-mira" title="КАЗАХСТАН: ЖАНАОЗЕН - ГОРОД, ИЗОЛИРОВАННЫЙ ОТ ОСТАЛЬНОГО МИРА " class="translation-link">Русский</a></li> </ul> Fri, 14 Dec 2012 12:16:42 +0000 gestion-abri 81 at https://www.wefightcensorship.org Belarus: Video close-up of police crackdown https://www.wefightcensorship.org/censored/belarus-video-close-police-crackdown <div id="node-field-pays" class="field field-name-field-pays field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><a href="/geo-zone/belarus-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel">Belarus</a></div> </div> </div> <div id="node-field-thematique" class="field field-name-field-thematique field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><a href="/themes/society" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel">Society</a></div> </div> </div> <div id="node-field-chapeau" class="field field-name-field-chapeau field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>In December 2010, Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko was re-elected after a fraud-ridden ballot. Lukashenko, head of state since 1994, topped the poll with almost 80 percent of the votes. Demonstrations that took place in the country subsequently were violently put down.&nbsp;The pro-democracy movement was silenced but new life was breathed into it in summer 2011. For about 10 weeks, peaceful demonstrations were held every Wednesday in the main towns and cities. Opposition rallies were banned but Belarusians demonstrated their creativity by using a variety of pretexts for the gatherings, such as attending open- air concerts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div id="node-body" class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"> <p>Banned from using slogans and banners, they expressed their discontent with ironic clapping. But this ruse was also soon banned. Journalists and bloggers covering the events were regularly arrested and ill-treated, and their equipment seized or damaged. Reporters Without Borders provides <a href="http://en.rsf.org/belarus-updates-on-media-freedom-07-07-2011,40579.html">regular updates in real time</a> of these events on its website.</p><p>The video presented here was made by a reporter with the Belarusian service of Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) during a demonstration on Independence Day, 3 July 2011. While she was filming the police making arrests, her camera was snatched from her hands by an officer. She got it back later and, in the confusion, the officer had failed to switch it off.</p><p>The video gives us a close-up view of the police crackdown on the demonstration. The officers, who were in plain clothes, behaved so brutally that the protesters called for help ... from the police. The enforcement officers were highly organized – they can be heard co-ordinating their actions, receiving orders to “crush” the protest and calling for reinforcements to deal with passive resistance by the demonstrators.</p><p>The journalist calls forcefully for the return of her video camera and demonstrators can be heard protesting at the detention of a child. By the end of the rally, more than 400 people had been arrested, including <a href="http://en.rsf.org/belarus-updates-on-media-freedom-07-07-2011,40579.html">more than 15 journalists</a>.</p><p>During 2011 alone, Reporters Without Borders recorded the arrests of more than 100 journalists and bloggers, and 34 prison convictions. Belarus, which lies next door to the European Union, is ranked 168th of 179 countries in the 2011/2012 World Press Freedom Index compiled by the organization.</p> </div> </div> </div> <ul class="links inline"><li class="translation_fr first last"><a href="/fr/censored/belarus-plongee-en-video-repression" title="Bélarus : Plongée en vidéo dans la répression" class="translation-link">Français</a></li> </ul> Thu, 08 Nov 2012 19:03:14 +0000 gestion-abri 47 at https://www.wefightcensorship.org